Order Now!

Follow Us:

What we Offer:

  • Effective research and writing
  • 24/7 Prompt reply
  • 275 words per double-spaced page
  • Double-spaced, 12pt Arial
  • Papers in less than 12 hours!
  • Comprehensive referencing
  • Citation style of your choice
  • Latest and relevant sources only
  • PhD and MBA professional writers
  • Discounts for all customers
  • 100% Privacy guaranteed
  • No hidden charges
  • Money-Back Guarantee
  • Customer Satisfaction

Our Clients Attend

FREE Extras:

  • FREE plagiarism report = 5$
  • FREE unlimited revisions > 5$
  • FREE title page = 2$
  • FREE bibliography = 5$
  • FREE outline = 2$
  • FREE email delivery = 2$
  • FREE formatting = 5$

You save at least $25!

Plagiarism Analyzer Certificate

123

REPORT WRITING SKILLS

Some academic assignments ask for a ‘report’, rather than an essay, and students are often confused about what that really means.

Likewise, in business, confronted with a request for a ‘report’ to a senior manager, many people struggle to know what to write.

Confusion often arises about the writing style, what to include, the language to use, the length of the document and other factors.

This page aims to disentangle some of these elements, and provide you with some advice designed to help you to write a good report.

What is a Report?

In academia there is some overlap between reports and essays, and the two words are sometimes used interchangeably, but reports are more likely to be needed for business, scientific and technical subjects, and in the workplace.

Whereas an essay presents arguments and reasoning, a report concentrates on facts.

Essentially, a report is a short, sharp, concise document which is written for a particular purpose and audience. It generally sets outs and analyses a situation or problem, often making recommendations for future action. It is a factual paper, and needs to be clear and well-structured.

Requirements for the precise form and content of a report will vary between organisation and departments and in study between courses, from tutor to tutor, as well as between subjects, so it’s worth finding out if there are any specific guidelines before you start.

Reports may contain some or all of the following elements:

  • A description of a sequence of events or a situation;
  • Some interpretation of the significance of these events or situation, whether solely your own analysis or informed by the views of others, always carefully referenced of course (see our page on Academic Referencing for more information);
  • An evaluation of the facts or the results of your research;
  • Discussion of the likely outcomes of future courses of action;
  • Your recommendations as to a course of action; and
  • Conclusions.

Not all of these elements will be essential in every report.

If you’re writing a report in the workplace, check whether there are any standard guidelines or structure that you need to use.

For example, in the UK many government departments have outline structures for reports to ministers that must be followed exactly.

Order NOW! Hesitating?